ANDREW, Maurice William, Lieutenant-Colonel - Distinguished Service Order - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945.

 

This officer assumed command of the Perth Regiment on 1 September 1944 and since that date has led it gallantly and successfully in every action in which the Brigade has participated from the Gothic Line in Italy to the capture of Delfzijl in Holland. A cool, conscientious and hard working officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew, by his brilliant leadership and organizing ability, has trained his unit ruthlessly into a highly respected and hard fighting machine. When in April 1945, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade was assigned the task of capturing the port of Delfzijl, the Perth Regiment was selected to carry out the first phase of the operation involving the breaching of the enemy defences in the area Holweirde-Nansum on the northern approach to Delfzijl. Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew planned this operation and with grim determination carried it out in the face of stubborn opposition from greatly superior numbers in strongly fortified positions. By aggressive tactics the Perth Regiment patrols gained detailed information of the enemy dispositions and strong points. With this information Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew completed his plan of attack and seizing the initiative, quickly put it into operation. One after another of the enemy strong points fell before the assaults of the regiment. After very heavt fighting the enemy's strongest position, on the line Holweirde-Nansum, was overcome and the approach to Delfzijl was opened. More than 500 prisoners were captured and eight heavy calibre guns destroyed. During this action this officer maintained his headquarters in an area constantly under shell fire and his calm and determined manner during the most critical periods were an inspiration and an example to his unit.

 

ANDREW, Maurice William, Lieutenant-Colonel, DSO - Mention in Despatches - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

 

 

ARNDT, Robert Julius, Corporal (M.107678) - Distinguished Conduct Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945. Recommended for immediate award; supported by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 5 May 1945 and passed forward on 8 May 1945; endorsed by Headquarters, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 11 May 1945 and passed forward on 19 May 1945; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 14 June 1945; approved by First Canadian Army on 6 July 1945 and passed for action on 8 July 1945.

 

On 29 April 1945, Corporal Arndt was commanding a section in "A" Company, the Perth Regiment. The company was engaged in a night attack on a very strong enemy position, in the area immediately south of the village of Nansum.

 

When the leading troops of the company reached a point approximately 100 yards from the southern edge of the village, a strong belt of wire was encountered and the enemy in a house 100 yards distant opened fire.

 

Corporal Arndt's section was ordered to breach the wire and assault the house from which the enemy was firing. Under the brilliant leadership of this Non-Commissioned Officer, the section succeeded in getting through the wire and across a deep water filled ditch. The enemy fire became more intense and machine guns were now firing at the section from both flanks as well as from the house. Corporal Arndt silenced some of the enemy by throwing a grenade through a window after which he dashed into the house alone firing his weapon. The enemy gave way before this determined assault and the section took 70 prisoners in addition to wounding six and killing several of the enemy. Six enemy machine guns were captured.

 

Several hours after the capture of the house, a force of approximately 30 enemy, armed with machine guns and Bazookas, counter-attacked and attempted to recapture the house. During this counter-attack, Corporal Arndt himself occupied a slit trench covering the left flank of the position. With great coolness and determination, he withheld his fire until the enemy were approximately 10 yards from him. When he opened fire, he killed five of the enemy, including two officers, and completely disorganized and routed the enemy. 

 

ARRELL, Clare Bert, Major, ED - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.

 

BAKER, Frederick Kenneth, Private (A.11166) - Military Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 May 1944 and CARO/4452 dated 10 May 1944, "in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Action for immediate award initiated by Lieutenant-Colonel W.S. Rutherford, Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Brigadier G. Kitching, Commander, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 27 January 1944; approved by Major-General Chris Vokes, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Division on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 5 February 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General C.W. Allfrey, Commander, 5th British Corps on 8 February 1944 and passed forward on 01 March 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General O.W.L. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 4 March 1944 and passed forward on 6 March 1944; approved by General H.R. Alexander, Commander-in-Chief, Allied Central Mediterranean Forces on 9 March 1944 and passed for action on 14 April 1944.

 

On 17 January 1944 during an assault by the Perth Regiment against enemy paratroops south of the Arielli River (Map Reference area 2917 on Reference Map Italy 1/50,000 Sheet 141-II Ortona), Private Baker, who was attached to "C" Company as Radio Transmission operator, kept continuous communications with the Battalion Tactical Headquarters under extremely harassing conditions, until his No.18 set was knocked out. His voice over the air was cool and collected and he quickly relayed information from his Company Commander and later his acting Company Commander.

 

When his Company Commander became a casualty and he could do nothing for him, he jumping into a slit trench with Company Sergeant-Major Kidd who was now Acting Company Commander. After spending some time trying to repair his wireless he saw another one some distance away belonging to the Forward Observation Officer attached to "C" Company, who had become a casualty. He left his slit trench, immediately coming under machine gun fire, but continued until he reached the wireless set. He returned to the trench with the set, contacted Battalion Tactical Headquarters and relayed information and received orders.

 

The courage and coolness displayed by Private Baker were of the highest quality. His determination and devotion to duty enabled communications to be maintained between Battalion Tactical Headquarters and the company at a most critical time.

 

 

BENNETT, John Frederick, Private (M.106776) - Military Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/55801, both dated 23 June 1945.

 

During the period from 1 September 1944 to 31 December 1944, Private Bennett fulfilled his duties as a soldier in the Perth Regiment with outstanding merit. His steadfastness and courage in carrying out his assignments while under extreme enemy fire have won the praise of his superiors and comrades. During the Battle for Coriano, Private Bennett acted as a company runner. When communications with one of the forward companies broke down due to very heavy enemy shelling and mortar fire, this soldier managed, in spite of the devastating effect of the Enemy's fire, to keep the company in constant communication with Battalion Headquarters during an extremely critical stage of the battle. Again when a company of the battalion had crossed the Bevano River, Private Bennett showed exceptional courage in carrying out his duties as runner. An outlying Platoon of the Company was fiercely counter-attacked by the enemy. The counter-attack was beaten off and several prisoners were taken. Although the Company Commander knew of the counter-attack, it was impossible for him to get any detailed information concerning the situation of the Platoon. Private Bennett and a comrade volunteered to contact the Platoon although this meant going forward some distance under very heavy shell and mortar fire. They succeeded in this hazardous mission and also brought back the prisoners captured by the Platoon. The information brought back, as well as that gained from the prisoners, enable the Company Commander to keep a dangerous situation well in hand. At all times Private Bennett has performed his duties in an energetic and capable manner. His courage and resourcefulness when under terrific fire has been an inspiration to the whole Battalion.

 

 

BRUCE, Donald Robert, Warrant Officer Class II (Company Sergeant-Major) (A.11185) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as pper Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

 

CARTER, Charles Thomas, Warrant Officer Class II (Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant) (A.11511) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as pper Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

 

CHAMBERLAIN, Robert Sydney, Lieutenant - Military Cross - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 May 1944 and CARO/4452 dated 10 May 1944, "in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Recommended for immediate award by Lieutenant-Colonel W.S. Rutherford, Commanding Officer, the Perth Regiment.; approved by Brigadier G. Kitching, Comd, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 26 January 1944 and passed forward on 27 January 1944; approved by Major-General C. Vokes, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Division on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 5 February 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General C.W. Allfrey, Commander, 5 Corps on 8 February 1944 and passed forward on 1 March 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General O.W.L. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 3 March 1944 and passed forward on 6 March 1944. Approved by General H.R. Alexander, Commander-in-Chief, Allied Combined Military Forces on 9 March 1944 and sent for action on 14 April 1944.

 

Reference Map Italy 1:50,000 Sheet 141 II Ortona - On 17 January 1944 South of the Arielli River at Map Reference area 2917 Lieutenant Chamberlain was the commander of the leading platoon in an assault by his company of The Perth Regiment.

 

Finding the only avenue of approach was to the right Lieutenant Chamberlain led his platoon in this direction, but was unable to maintain contact with the balance of the company after 0545 Hours. The stiff enemy opposition finally split his platoon, two sections became detached. Lieutenant Chamberlain however boldly pushed on and after fierce fighting succeeded in placing his small force on the platoon objective, accounting for the enemy machine gun posts sited thereon and the enemy who manned them.

 

During the day and evening this officer and the handful of men under his command doggedly repelled determined attempts to dislodge them, inflicting casualties on the enemy. Shortly after midnight on 18 January 1944, having been unable to make contact the entire day, Lieutenant Chamberlain safely disengaged his section and led them back to rejoin the unit.

 

Throughout this action, Lieutenant Chamberlain led his men with the greatest courage and determination. He personally accounted for several of the enemy and under his inspiring leadership his men reached and held their objective under heavy odds.

 

CHARBONNEAU, Louis, Private (A.18293) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 July 1944 and CARO/4799 dated 12 August 1944.

 

CHARBONNEAU, Louis, Private (A.18293) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.- Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.

 

COLE, Robert, Captain (Acting Major) - Distinguished Service Order - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5396, both dated 24 February 1945. Approved by Brigade Headquarters on 25 December 1944 and passed forward on 27 December 1944; supported by Division Headquarters on 28 December 1944 and passed forward on 31 December 1944; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 2 January 1945 and passed forward on 3 January 1945; supported by Headquarters, Eighth Army on 6 January 1945 and passed forward on 10 January 1945.

 

On the night 19/20 December 1944, the Perth Regiment was ordered to cross the Fossa Munio, capture a vital road junction and extend left along the Senio River to form a bridgehead.

 

The leading company, after suffering heavy casualties from machine gun fire, was unable to effect a crossing and "A" Company, commanded by Major Cole, was ordered to cross and seize the road junction. The crossing of the river and advance to the objective was made over open ground under intense enemy artillery, mortar and machine gun fire. Under his personal leadership and skilful handling, the company kept close up to the supporting artillery fire and as a result reached the objective without serious casualties at about 2200 hours after by-passing strongly held enemy positions which continued to hold up further advance across the river.

 

The stubborn defence of the enemy prevented the crossing of supporting troops and the company was completely isolated on the objective. At first light 20 December, the enemy launched a series of heavy counter-attacks on the company position with infantry supported by machine gun and artillery fire. Despite the fact that Major Cole had been painfully wounded in the face during the night, he personally directed the defence of the position, holding the artillery and small arms defensive fire until the enemy were at extremely close range, which in some cases was only 30 yards. As a result, many of the enemy were killed, 23 prisoners taken and the balance forced to withdraw, thus clearing the area between the objective and the river. The company position was vital to the maintenance of the bridgehead and the stubborn resistance put up by the company forced the enemy to concentrate the greater part of his effort against this position. This relieved the pressure on the actual bridge site, allowing time for a bridge to be built thus enabling our infantry and supporting arms to cross the river.

 

By his magnificent leadership and courageous determination, Major Cole inspired his men to establish and successfully hold the brigade bridgehead.

 

COOPER, Thomas, Lieutenant - Military Cross - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5446, both dated 10 March 1945. Recommendation for immediate award approved by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 25 December 1944 and passed forward on 26 December 1944; approved by Headquarters, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 27 December 1944 and passed forward on 31 December 1944; approved by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 5 January 1945 and passed forward on 9 January 1945; approved by Headquarters, Eighth Army on 10 January 1945 and passed forward on 14 January 1945.

 

On the night 19/20 December 1944, the Perth Regiment attacked across the Fossa Munio to seize positions along the Senio River.

 

The leading company after crossing the Fosso Munio in the face of heavy mortar and small arms fire suffered heavy casualties and was unable to advance. "A" Company was then ordered to attack. Lieutenant Cooper, who was acting as second in command, personally led two platoons across the river and over open ground, under heavy machine gun fire, to the company objective.

 

The company position was completely surrounded by enemy posts which had been by-passed in the advance. At first light a strong counter-attack by approximately a company of infantry, with artillery and machine guns in support, was launched against the position from three sides. Lieutenant Cooper, in the face of heavy fire, constantly moved from section to section directing the defence of the position, encouraging the men and assisting the Company Commander who had been wounded. The counter-attack was repulsed with heavy casualties to the enemy and the capture of 25 prisoners. Lieutenant Cooper then assumed command of the company. Throughout the day the enemy continued to counter-attack in a determined effort to recapture the position. Under the skilful leadership of this gallant officer, who moved about the position, under intense machine gun and mortar fire, organizing the defence and personally directing the fire, all attacks were repulsed with heavy losses and the position firmly held until 1800 hours when supporting arms were able to reach the company.

 

The indomitable spirit, courage and leadership of this officer were an inspiration to the men and contributed in great measure to the success of the company and the subsequent consolidation of a firm bridgehead by the Perth Regiment.

 

COTE, George Francis, Private (A.22743) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945. Recommendation for immediate MM cleared by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 5 May 1945 and passed forward on 8 May 1945; supported by Headquarters, 4 Canadian Armoured Division on 11 May 1945 and passed forward on 22 May 1945; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 14 June 1945; ratified by Headquarters, First Canadian Army on 6 July 1945 and passed for action on 8 July 1945.

 

On the afternoon of 26 April 1945, Private Cote was with a platoon of the Perth Regiment holding a position in the area of Uitiende, north of the town of Holweirde.

 

The company were preparing to advance and attack enemy positions approximately 1,300 yards away. Some of the houses between the Perth Regiment positions and the main enemy positions were occupied by the enemy. Information concerning the enemy in these houses was vital to the success of the attack. Private Cote volunteered and in company with another soldier carried out a detailed reconnaissance of the houses and ground to within 300 yards of the main enemy positions.

 

All of the ground travelled by Private Cote and his companion was flat, offered little cover from view and was constantly swept by mortar and small arms fire. Private Cote returned with a detailed report on previously unknown minefields, enemy positions and strengths. With the information gained by Private Cote, the Company Commander planned and carried out an advance which overran the enemy outposts.

 

Thirty-seven prisoners were taken and the company seized positions from which it was able to launch an attack, on the following night, on the main enemy positions.

 

On the following night while the attack on the main enemy positions was in progress, one of the leading platoons was counter-attacked. The position was critical as the platoon was running out of ammunition. Private Cote, then with a reserve platoon, volunteered to carry ammunition to the besieged platoon. This hazardous journey was made by Private Cote, burdened by the load of ammunition, across nearly 1,000 yards of ground in full view of the enemy. The whole area was under heavy shell fire as well as machine gun fire, but, undaunted by this hazard, Private Cote reached the forward platoon with the ammunition and thereby enabled the platoon to beat off the counter-attack.

 

Throughout the entire action the courage and initiative of Private Cote was an inspiration to all ranks and his actions were in large measure responsible for the successful attack by the company.

 

CURTIS, George Frederick, Warrant Officer Class I (Regimental Sergeant-Major) (A.16614) - Military Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as pper Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

 

This Warrant Officer has held the appointment of Regimental Sergeant-Major of the Perth Regiment continuously from 15 November 1943 until the cessation of hostilities in Northwest Europe 8 May 1945. On 20 December 1944 Regimental Sergeant-Major Curtis personally carried ammunition to the most forward troops. On one occasion on this day he led an ammunition carrying party forward toward a company which had been cut off by the enemy. While leading this party forward Regimental Sergeant-Major Curtis, carrying a heavy case of ammunition, was surprised by three enemy who were undetected until he was within a few feet of them. Burdened by the ammunition, unable to draw his pistol, he was forced to surrender and although covered by the enemy weapons succeeded in warning the remainder of the party who were then enabled to evade capture. Regimental Sergeant-Major Curtis remained a prisoner for more than five hours. While being led back through the enemy lines Regimental Sergeant-Major Curtis and his captors were caught in one of our artillery barrages. When his captors leaped into a ditch, to obtain cover, this Warrant Officer, with supreme courage dashed off through the intense fire, succeeded in evading his captors and after several hours made his way back through the enemy lines to his own unit, bringing back with him detailed information of enemy dispositions. This information made it possible for the Perth Regiment to carry out immediately a successful attack, during which nine machine gun positions were captured with many prisoners. This action forced the enemy to withdraw across the Senio River. During active operations Regimental Sergeant-Major Curtis remained always at the unit's most forward headquarters from which point, with great determination, often in the face of heavy fire from enemy artillery, mortars and small arms he ensured that the supply of ammunition was maintained. This Warrant Officer has shown outstanding courage, leadership and initiative throughout many months of hard fighting.

 

DEMERS, Eugene Joseph, Private B.102081) - Bronze Lion (Holland) - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended by Major H.A. Snelgrove, Acting Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Lieutenant-Colonel R.B. Somerville, Officer Commanding 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 26 August 1945 and passed forward on 30 August 1945; approved by Brigadier I.S. Johnston, General Officer Commanding 5 Canadian Armoured Division, 31 August 1945 and passed to forward on 4 September 1945; Final approval by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds, General Officer Commanding Canadian Forces in the Netherlands on 4 September 1945 and passed on for action on 26 September 1945.

 

Private Demers was a member of a Company of the Perth Regiment which was advancing from the village of Bierum to attack a strong enemy position in the town of Nansun, on the night of 30 April/1 May 1945.

 

During the advance an unsuspected enemy position opened fire on Private Demers' platoon. As soon as the enemy opened fire Private Demers, on his own initiative took up a position from which he immediately engaged the enemy. This prompt action diverted the enemy fire and enabled his platoon to reach a position from which it was able to organize an attack. The enemy position was captured, fifty-two prisoners were taken, two of the enemy were killed, and six enemy machine guns were captured.

 

At dawn on 1 May 1945 an enemy force of approximately seventy launched a counter-attack. Again, on his own initiative, Private Demers dashed to a point of vantage and from there engaged the leading enemy troops who were preparing to open fire with two bazookas. Both the bazooka operators were killed and the leading enemy troops forced to take cover. The delay thus caused enabled the Company to prepare for the attack which was successfully beaten off with thirty casualties inflicted upon the enemy. Private Demers on both of these occasions displayed great courage, initiative and judgment of a very high order.

 

DERRICK, John Lordun, Private (Acting Corporal) (D.137936) - Military Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 26 August 1944 and CARO/4986 dated 14 October 1944. "In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Recommended for immediate award by Lieutenant-Colonel J.S.H. Lind, Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Brigadier T.E. Snow, Commander, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 9 June 1944 and passed forward 10 June 1944; approved by Major-General B.M. Hoffmeister, General Officer Commanding, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 10 June 1944 and passed forward on 11 June 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General E.L.M. Burns, Commander, 1 Canadian Corps; approved by Lieutenant-General O.W.H. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 17 June 1944 and passed forward on 24 June 1944; approved by General H.R. Alexander, Commander-in-Chief, Allied Central Mediterranean Force on 25 June 1944. See Military Medal to Private Douglas Herbert Thompson.

 

On 27th May 1944, at approximately 1300 hours, the Battalion [Perth Regiment] was consolidating ground taken at point 106 after passing through Ceprano. The Battalion was without support of anti-tank guns. Tracked vehicles were heard forming up immediately in front of the positions occupied by "D" Company in which Corporal Derrick was a section leader. Corporal Derrick worked his section 700 yards into enemy occupied territory under constant machine gun and rifle fire and knocked out one half-tracked vehicle, after which the others withdrew. On the same afternoon, "C" Company on the left of "D" Company ran out of ammunition and were without wireless communication to the rear. On hearing this, Corporal Derrick immediately gathered up surplus ammunition in "D" Company and lead his section with the ammunition to "C" Company. Throughout this operation he was under observed enemy machine gun and rifle fire. Still later in the same day, "C" Company requested assistance from "D" Company and Corporal Derrick lead his Platoon Commander and the platoon by the best route available to reinforce "C" Company and as a result of his previous activities was able to place the platoon in a position from which fire was brought on the enemy and "C" Company relieved.

 

Throughout the entire day, this Non-Commissioned Officer's unswerving devotion to duty, keen sense of initiative and high sense of leadership were an example to all and his actions were in great measure responsible for the successful holding of point 106.

 

DORSCHNER, Delwin Charles, Private (Acting Corporal) (B.132671) - Military Medal - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

 

Corporal Dorschner has served as private soldier and Non-Commissioned Officer in the Perth Regiment with outstanding merit throughout the entire period of action in Italy and Northwest Europe. On 19 December 1944, "A" Company crossed the Munio River in Italy and was surrounded by superior enemy forces who launched a series of counter-attacks supported [by] machine guns, mortars and tanks. When the first attack was launched, the Platoon Sergeant was at Company Headquarters and Corporal Dorschner (then a Private) immediately took control of the Platoon weapons and directed the fire with such skill and daring that this and subsequent attacks were repulsed and the vital position held. When the counter-attacks ceased he led a Section in a series of attacks against and cleared a group of buildings from which the enemy had supported the counter-attacks with machine gun fire. This daring action removed the last threat to the Company position. On 24 December 1944, this Non-Commissioned Officer was acting as Second-in-Command of his Section. His Platoon was advancing to clear a sector of the near bank of the Senio River in Italy when it came under heavy fire from a well concealed machine gun and grenades. While the platoon took cover and without waiting for orders, Corporal Dorschner ran fifty yards over open ground and took up a position in the top floor of a house from which he engaged the enemy gun with his bren. He silenced the gun and killed the crew thereby enabling his Platoon to attain its objective without further delay or loss of life. At all times Corporal Dorschner has carried out his duties in an energetic and efficient manner. Both as Private Soldier and Non-Commissioned Officer he has consistently displayed outstanding initiative, leadership and courage which has won the praise of his superiors and been an inspiration to all ranks in the Battalion.

 

DOUCET, Herbert Emile Theodore, Lieutenant-Colonel, OBE - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

 

DOUCET, Herbert Emile Theodore, Lieutenant-Colonel - Officer, Order of the British Empire - Infantry (General Staff Officer I (Liaison), Headquarters, First Canadian Army) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 17 MMarch 1945 and CARO/5466 dated 19 March 1945.

 

DOWNHAM, George Francis, Lieutenant - Military Cross - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5304, both dated 27 January 1945. Recommendation for immediate MC approved by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 26 September 1944; approved by Headquarters 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 28 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 October 1944; approved by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 4 November 1944; approved by Headquarters, Eighth Army on 7 November 1944 and passed forward on 15 November 1944.

 

At 0100 hours, 13 September 1944, "C" Company, Perth Regiment, began the advance to the Coriano Ridge. The advance was over very difficult country and in the intense fire and darkness, the leading section became confused. Lieutenant Downham immediately went forward, and moving well ahead of his men, led them bound-by-bound through heavy mortar and machine gun fire to the top of the Feature. Nearing the objective Lieutenant Downham halted his platoon and went forward alone to ascertain the best line of approach. The platoon then advanced, captured their objective and began digging in. During the consolidation, a number of Mark IV tanks approached the position from the left flank. Lieutenant Downham ordered his platoon to continue digging, took a PIAT himself and moved to a flank to engage the tanks. When he opened fire the tanks turned in his direction and returned his fire. Lieutenant Downham disregarded the fire and continued to engage the tanks with good effect, one tank being damaged and the remainder forced to withdraw.

 

Throughout the action, the skill, courage and utter unselfishness of this officer were an example to his men and his inspiring leadership enabled them to seize and hold the vital left flank of "C" Company's position.

 

FISHER, Peter Francis, Captain (Acting Major) - Military Cross - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

 

This officer has served with the Perth Regiment without relief throughout every action in Italy and Northwest Europe as platoon commander, second-in-command of a company and company commander. On 2 January 1945, in Italy, during the advance on Conventello north of Highway 16, Major Fisher, in command of "D" Company, led his company over flat ground void of cover to seize the objective. So skillfully did he manoeuvre his company that, in spite of the heavy opposition, it quickly overran the heavily fortified enemy positions and took 23 prisoners. On 4 January 1945, during the same action, Major Fisher's company was placed under command of the 9 Canadian Armoured Regiment whose task was to capture San Alberto and exploit to Commacchio Spit. To achieve this a crossing had to be made over the Lamone River. Upon receiving information from patrols that a bridge was still intact, Major Fisher immediately led his company forward with such speed and dash that the bridge was captured before it could be blown. The capture of this all important bridge was an outstanding and brilliant achievement which resulted in the successful completion of the divisional plan. In Holland, on 3 April 1945, while in command of "A" Company, Major Fisher, in an advance on Nijmegen Island, led and directed his company with such skill and daring against heavy, stubborn opposition that the town of Driel was cleared with only three casualties. During the advance on Delfzijl, on 23 April 1945, this officer personally led his company in an attack on Hoiwierde, a strongly defended town on the perimeter defences of the port. By his coolness under extremely heavy fire Major Fisher inspired his men so that they succeeded in occupying the objective and in holding it until relieved. Throughout this entire period Major Fisher has so inspired his men by his courage and leadership that they have never failed to accomplish their task. His cheerfulness and high sense of duty to his men is directly responsible for the success of his company and the respect in which he is held. Throughout his entire career in Italy and Northwest Europe he has served with true merit and efficiency.

 

FOREMAN, John William, Private (A.12013) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

 

GALLAGHER, George Alvin, Captain - Bronze Lion (Holland) - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended by Major H.A. Snelgrove, Acting Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Lieutenant-Colonel R.B. Sommerville, Officer Commanding 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade; approved by Brigadier I.S. Johnston, Acting General Officer Commanding 5 Canadian Armoured Division. Final approval by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds, General Officer Commanding Canadian Forces in the Netherlands on 4 September 1945 and passed on for action on 26 September 1945.

 

On the night of 24 April 1945, Lieutenant Gallagher was commanding a platoon of The Perth Regiment. His company was attacking Holwierde, a strongly defended village on the outer defences of the port of Delfzijl. Approaching Holwierde the Platoon was subjected to intense artillery fire from a battery at Nansum and from several SP guns in the immediate area. Lieutenant Gallagher personally led his platoon through the artillery fire and when engaged by small arms fire from several houses led his men in clearing the houses, killing seven Germans and forcing the remainder to withdraw. After consolidating on their objective, the platoon was once more subjected to heavy concentrations of artillery fire which systematically blew down the houses in the area. Lieutenant Gallagher, by his coolness and courage under fire inspired his men to hold on to the position which was vital to the success of the operation and which eventually led to the capture of Delfzijl.

 

GOODING, Vern Edgar, Private (A.50574) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

 

GRAINGER, John Nelson, Warrant Officer Class II (Company Sergeant-Major) (A.11799) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as pper Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.

 

GRANT, George Edward, Corporal (Acting Sergeant) (A.11200) - Military Medal (The Perth Regiment) - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5540, both dated 7 April 1945. Recommendation cleared by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 8 January 1945 and passed forward on 16 January 1945; supported by Headquarters, 4 Canadian Armoured Division on 17 January 1945 and passed forward on 18 January 1945; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 21 January 1945 and passed forward on 26 January 1945; endorsed by Headquarters, Eighth Army, on 29 January 1945 and passed for action on 2 February 1945.

 

On the night 2/3 January 1945, this Non-Commissioned Officer was ordered to lead forward a reconnaissance patrol of five men from the position occupied by "D" Company, The Perth Regiment, near Conventello to the Fosso Vetro. On his return he spotted an enemy patrol moving toward his unit position. He returned to his Company Headquarters and obtained permission to take his patrol out again to ambush the enemy. While in the process of establishing hasty defences in Casa Galavatti, approximately five hundred yards in front of the most forward position of his company, he was engaged by an enemy force estimated at forty in strength. They surrounded the house, swept the doors and windows with small arms fire, fired eight bazooka bombs into the house and then charged toward it. So skillfully had Sergeant Grant organized his position that all approaches were covered and when he gave the order to fire, at a range of approximately twenty yards, heavy casualties were inflicted and the enemy disorganized. Six of the enemy succeeded however in gaining entrance to the ground floor. Sergeant Grant led two of his men down the stairs where they succeeded in killing them all with grenades and Tommy gun fire.

 

From the time of the initial assault until relieved nine hours later, this small force was repeatedly attacked. Each time the enemy was beaten off until finally eight of them were killed and twelve wounded. Sergeant Grant himself was responsible for killing two and wounding five.

 

This position was vital to the enemy as subsequent events showed he intended to use it as a base for a full scale counter-attack. The bravery and skill displayed by Sergeant Grant and his grim determination to hold this position against terrific odds foiled the enemy's plans and allowed his battalion to continue its advance.

 

HALL, William James, Sergeant (Acting Company Quartermaster-Sergeant) (B.42223) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as pper Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.

 

HANSFORD, William John, Sergeant (A.11178) - Military Medal - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

 

Sergeant Hansford has served with the Mortar Platoon of The Perth Regiment throughout every action which the Battalion has fought in Italy and Holland. During the period of 18 May to 1 April 1944, The Perth Regiment held a position in front of Cassino in Italy. The position was dominated by enemy observation posts on Monte Cairo. Sergeant Hansford manned a mortar observation post for four days in a position in which every move brought down intense enemy fire. From this position, he directed the fire of the mortars with devastating accuracy. On 20 December 1944, during the fighting on the Munio Canal in Italy, this Non-Commissioned Officer crawled forward tot he Canal dyke and exposed himself to intense enemy small arms fire in order to locate an enemy machine-gun post. Having located the post, he called down dire, on the enemy post one hundred yards away, well knowing that some of the fire might fall upon his own position. Some of the mortar bombs did fall within a few yards of him but Sergeant Hansford maintained his position until his mortars had destroyed the enemy post. Later on the same day a Company of the Perth Regiment were cut off by three enemy self-propelled guns firing over open sights. Sergeant Hansford, in the face of heavy enemy fire, crawled to within two hundred yards of these guns and directed his mortars so successfully that one enemy gun was knocked out and the remaining two forced to withdraw. The withdrawal of the guns enabled the beleaguered Company to be relieved. On 26 April 1945 Sergeant Hansford led his Mortar Platoon into a position, near Holweirde in Holland, within four hundred yards of three enemy self-propelled guns. These guns, firing over open sights, knocked out one of the mortars but Sergeant Hansford encouraged his men to continue firing the remaining mortar and even moved it forward another hundred yards in order to engage the enemy infantry positions. Two houses occupied by the enemy were set on fire by the mortars and many casualties inflicted. Not only has Sergeant Hansford fought with his Battalion in every action but he has commanded the Mortar Platoon during the greater part of the period due to the absence of an officer. The magnificent courage and leadership which he has displayed throughout has been an inspiration to the men and his skill in handling his Platoon has had a direct bearing on the success of the Battalion.

 

HARPER, Leslie Edwin, Private (B.115977) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6007, both dated 1 September 1945.

 

HAYWARD, Albert Malcolm, Private (A.108410) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5396, both dated 24 February 1945. Immediate award; initiated by Lieutenant-Colonel M.W. Andrew, Commanding Officer, The Perth Regiment; supported by Headquarters, by 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 25 December 1944 and passed forward on 27 December 1944; supported by Major-General B.M. Hoffmeister, General Officer Commanding 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 28 December 1944 and passed forward on 31 December 1944; supported by Major-General Charles Foulkes, Commander 1 Canadian Corps on 2 January 1945 and passed forward on 3 January 1945; endorsed by Lieutenant-General R.L. McCreery, General Officer Commanding Eighth Army on 6 January 1945 and passed forward on 10 January 1945; approved by Field Marshal H.R. Alexander, Supreme Allied Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Theatre.

 

On the night of 10 December 1944, "A" Company, Perth Regiment, made an assault crossing over the River Lamone. During the crossing, skillfully sited machine gun posts and mortars swept the river, and the leading platoon was having difficulty in clearing the boats. In spite of the very heavy fire, Private Hayward remained on the bank until the whole platoon was across and assisted his comrades out of the boats and directed them to cover under the high bank.

 

During this operation he located an enemy machine gun post about 100 yards away which was holding up the advance from the river bank. As soon as the last of his platoon had landed, Private Hayward rushed the post single-handed and succeeded in silencing the gun with grenades, killing two of the crew and wounding two others. As a result of his courageous action the platoon was able to advance from the river bank and the Company to establish a firm bridgehead.

 

HIDER, William Charles, Lieutenant - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

 

HUTCHINSON, Edmund Mann, Captain - Mention in Despatches (Perth Regiment) - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

 

LAWLER, James Andrew, Lance-Corporal (B.100060) - Military Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5283, both dated 20 January 1945. Immediate award; initiated as a DCM by Lieutenant-Colonel W.W. Reid, Commanding Officer, The Perth Regiment; supported by Commander of 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 16 September 1944 and passed forward on 20 September 1944; supported by Brigadier B.M. Hoffmeister, General Officer Commanding 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 25 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 October 1944; endorsed by Lieutenant-General E.L.M. Burns, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 4 November 1944; downgraded from a Distinguished Conduct Medal to a Military Medal by Lieutenant-General R.W. McCreery, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 27 October 1944 and passed forward on 5 November 1944; granted by Field Marshal H.R. Alexander, Supreme Allied Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Theatre.

 

On 13 September 1944, at about 0230 hours, the leading elements of the Perth Regiment arrived on their objective on the Coriano Ridge.

 

While "C" Company was consolidating, a counter-attack by tanks developed and for some time the situation was critical. One tank had reached a position from which it could enfilade some of "C" Company's defences and Private Lawler was ordered to engage it with his PIAT. Although there was very little cover, he crept up to within fifteen yards of the tank and disabled it with a single round.

 

A few minutes later Private Lawler was ordered to engage a fortified mortar position. With great coolness, he worked his way forward to within a few yards of the enemy post and succeeded in silencing it with two well-aimed shots.

 

During both these actions Private Lawler was well forward of his Company position and was exposed to heavy machine gun and mortar fire from the front and flanks.

 

His outstanding courage and the thoroughness with which he carried out his task enabled the Company to become firmly established on its objective.

 

LIND, John Skiffington, Lieutenant-Colonel - Distinguished Service Order - Infantry (Perth Regiment of Canada) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 26 AAugust 1944 and CARO/4986 dated 14 October 1944. "In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Commanding Officer, the Perth Regiment of Canada in 1944. Promoted Brigadier and commanded the 12th Canadian Infantry Brigade from 13 August 1944 to 12 March 1945 (he and Dan Spry only two Commanders of this formation). Immediate award; endorsed by Brigadier T.E. Snow, Commanding 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade; supported by Major-General B.M. Hoffmeister, General Officer Commanding, 5 Canadian Armoured Division; endorsed by Lieutenant-General E.L.M. Burns, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Corps; endorsed by Lieutenant-General O.W.L. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 17 June 1944 and passed forward on 24 June 1944; approved by General H.R. Alexander, General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Allied Army in Italy on 25 June 1944.

 

Lieutenant-Colonel Lind throughout the operation led the Perth Regiment with great dash and dogged determination, and although he was continually under intense enemy shellfire for several days on end was never deterred from the task in hand. At the crossing of the Liri River near Caprano on the 27th May 1944, with his battalion being subjected to steady enemy artillery fire, he went forward to the leading platoons, who were assembling in an area which was under observed enemy shell and machine gun fire from the far bank, and, ignoring his own safety, personally directed and supervised the crossing in assault boats of his entire Battalion. His courage, determination and personal disregard for his own safety set a high example to his men and resulted in the formation of a bridgehead across the river thus allowing the engineers to bridge and the remainder of the Division to cross and continue the advance.

 

Throughout this action, Lieutenant-Colonel Lind's leadership and example to his men was of the highest order.

 

LIND, John Skiffington, Lieutenant-Colonel (Acting Brigadier), DSO - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 September 1945 and CARO/6074 of that date.

 

LIND, John Skiffington Heming, Brigadier, DSO, ED - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

 

LYONS, George Arthur, Lance-Corporal (A.11360) - Military Medal - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 May 1944 and CARO/4452 dated 10 May 1944, "in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Recommended for immediate award by Lieutenant-Colonel W.S. Rutherford, Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Brigadier G. Kitching, Commander, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 27 January 1944; approved by Major-General Chris Vokes, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Infantry Division on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 5 February 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General C.W. Allfrey, Commanding, 5 British Corps on 8 February 1944 and passed forward on 1 March 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General O.W.H. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 4 March 1944 and passed forward on 6 March 1944; approved by General H.R. Alexander, General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, 15 Allied Combined Military Force on 9 March 1944 and passed for action on 14 April 1944.

 

On the 17th January 1944, in the attack on enemy positions in the area Map Reference 2917, one section of No. 15 Platoon, "C" Company, The Perth Regiment, gained the objective at the top of a hill, but immediately came under fire from a machine gun nest and two weapon slits close by.

 

Jumping from cover, Lance-Corporal Lyons dashed forward round the right flank of the position and, when he was within range, threw a grenade at the same time falling to the ground. The grenade killed the two Germans in the weapon slits.

 

Meanwhile, under cover of the attack, the Platoon Commander was able to get close enough to grenade the machine gun nest and the position was neutralized.

 

With his Platoon Commander, Lance-Corporal Lyons took cover in the enemy position for some 15 minutes, when they observed a German get up and run towards another slit trench. Lance-Corporal Lyons chased him with his machine carbine and, when that jammed, hurled a grenade which hit the German just as he jumped into the trench.

 

Later, when the enemy closed in on their position the Bren gun of the section jammed. Lying in a very shallow slit trench and under sniper and machine gun fire, Lance-Corporal Lyons cleared the stoppage and got the gun operating.

 

Throughout this action, Lance-Corporal Lyons displayed great courage and cheerfulness, inspiring and encouraging his men in their isolated position.

 

 

MILLS, Clarence James, Private (H.8018) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5304, both dated 27 January 1945. Immediate award; initiated by Lieutenant-Colonel M.W. Andrew, Commanding Officer, The Perth Regiment; approved by Commander of 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 16 September 1944 and passed forward on 20 September 1944; supported by Brigadier B.M. Hoffmeister, General Officer Commanding, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 22 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 October 1944; endorsed by Lieutenant-General E.L.M. Burns, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 4 November 1944; endorsed by Lieutenant-General R.W. McCreery, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 7 November 1944 and passed forward on 15 November 1944; granted by Field Marshal H.R. Alexander, Supreme Allied Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Theatre.

 

On 31 August 1944, during the attack on the Gothic Line, the Perth Regiment was consolidated on high ground near Montecchio, north of the Foglia River. The battalion, and particularly "B" Company's position, was heavily mortared and shelled. Many casualties were suffered during the attack on this feature, and the period of consolidation, Private Mills, stretcher bearer attached to "B" Company walked about the battle field rendering first aid and assisting in the evacuation.

 

On the night 21 August / 1 September 1944, the battalion was consolidated on Feature 204, northwest of Feature 111. During the counter-attack on the battalion position that night which caused heavy casualties Private Mills, the only available stretcher bearer, rendered first aid to all the wounded in "A" and "B" Companies, all the time under heavy fire.

 

From the time the battalion was committed to action until the final objectives in the Gothic Line were reached, Private Mills worked without rest and with the most unswerving devotion to duty. His quiet manner and efficiency, coolness and determination under heavy fire, were an inspiration to all ranks.

 

MOFFATT, William Frederick, Corporal (B.143355) - Bronze Lion (Holland) - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended by Major H.A. Snelgrove, Acting Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Lieutenant-Colonel R.B. Sommerville, Officer Commanding 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 26 August 1945 and passed forward on 30 August 1945; approved by Brigadier I.S. Johnston, Acting General Officer Commanding 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 31 August 1945 and passed forward on 4 September 1945. Final approval by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds, General Officer Commanding Canadian Forces in the Netherlands on 4 September 1945 and passed on for action on 26 September 1945.

 

On 24 April 1945 a platoon of the Perth Regiment was holding a position on the west bank of the canal which divides the village of Holwierde. Corporal Moffatt was commanding an outpost which overlooked the enemy positions across the canal. During the afternoon an enemy patrol of approximately ten men crossed the canal unobserved and attacked the outpost, partially demolishing it with bazookas. Corporal Moffatt, although aware that this post was already outnumbered, felt that there would be casualties if all of his men remained. He therefore sent all except one to rejoin the platoon. The enemy attack succeeded in reaching the outpost, but Corporal Moffatt's fire, and that of his companion, was so effective that four of the enemy were killed as they neared the outpost. Three others were killed inside the position and the remaining three enemy wounded. During the assault upon the outpost Corporal Moffatt observed a larger enemy force preparing to attack the main platoon position. As soon as the attack on the outpost had collapsed, Corporal Moffatt and his companion rejoined the platoon and assisted in beating off the main enemy counter-attack. Corporal Moffatt's determined and courageous defence of his outpost delayed the main enemy attack, thereby gaining time for the platoon to prepare and hold its objective, from which the company subsequently continued the attack.

 

 

PICKENS, Murlin Joshua, Lance-Corporal (Acting Corporal) (A.11701) - Distinguished Conduct Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 May 1944 and CARO/4452 dated 10 May 1944, "in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Immediate award; originated by Lieutenant-Colonel W.S. Rutherford, Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; supported by Brigadier G. Kitching, Commanding 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 27 January 1944; endorsed by Major-General Chris Vokes, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Division on 28 January 1944 and passed forward on 5 February 1944; supported by Lieutenant-General C.W. Allfrey, Commanding 5 British Corps on 8 February 1944 and passed forward on 1 March 1944; supported by Lieutenant-General O.W.L. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 4 March 1944 and passed forward on 6 March 1944; approved by General H.R. Alexander, Commander-in-Chief, Allied Combined Mediterranean Force on 9 March 1944 and passed for action on 14 April 1944.

 

On 17 January 1944, the Perth Regiment put in an attack against strong enemy positions south of Arielli River in the area Map Reference 2917 (Reference Map Italy 1:50,000 Sheet 141-II Ortona).

 

During the assault, Corporal Pickens was Acting Platoon Sergeant of No. 17 Platoon, "D" Company. When his platoon came under heavy machine gun fire, Corporal Pickens went forward alone in order to reconnoitre new positions and the best route to them and then led the platoon into these positions, thus avoiding casualties. One man in his section was however wounded. Corporal Pickens pinpointed the fire and by skilful use of cover, stalked the enemy post and disposed of it single handed.

 

A few minutes later the leading section came under heavy mortar, machine gun and sniper fire as they came over the crest of a slope. Corporal Pickens was at the time at Platoon Headquarters. Quickly appreciating the situation and realising that the momentum of the attack must not be lost, he dashed forward and shouting "Follow me, there's nothing to it", led the section on. He then returned and brought the remainder of the platoon forward in the same manner, inspiring the men by his gallantry and drive to continue the advance in spite of intense fire.

 

The courage and leadership displayed by Corporal Pickens were of the highest order. By his dash and elan he inspired the platoon to drive forward in the face of bitter resistance until the enemy fire was sufficiently neutralised to enable the remainder of "D" Company to occupy their intermediate objective.


 

PRASHAW, Richard Arnold, Private (A.106881) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945.

 

RAWDING, Maxwell Cameron, Private (Acting Corporal) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5396, both dated 24 February 1945. Endorsed by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 25 December 1944 and passed forward on 27 December 1944; supported by Headquarters, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 28 December 1944 and passed forward on 31 December 1944; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 2 January 1945 and passed forward on 3 January 1945; approved by Army on 6 January 1945 and passed for action on 10 January 1945.

 

On the night of 10 December 1944, the Perth Regiment made a crossing of the Lamone River. "B" Company made the initial bridgehead with Lance-Sergeant Rawding's platoon leading. Before Lance-Sergeant Rawding's boat reached the far side, a heavily manned machine gun opened up from the left flank inflicting casualties. Realizing that the success of the crossing was imperilled unless the machine gun was silenced, he jumped out of the boat and ran towards the machine gun post which was about 150 yards away. When he was 50 yards from the gun, he fired a burst killing one of the crew. The machine gun was switched on him and he was forced to take cover when only 20 yards away. He threw two grenades and then rushed the post in the face of withering fire throwing grenades as he ran, killing two more and wounding the other three of the crew.

 

This courageous action not only enabled the company to get across the river and establish a bridgehead but was directly responsible for reducing the number of casualties.

 

REID, William Wright, Major - Mention in Despatches - Infantry - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.

 

REID, William Wright, Major (Acting Lieutenant-Colonel), ED - Distinguished Service Order - Infantry (Perth Regiment of Canada) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5283, both dated 20 January 1945. Commanding Officer, the Perth Regiment of Canada in 1944. Immediate award; endorsed by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 1 September 1944; supported by Headquarters, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 17 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 October 1944; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 23 October 1944; approved by Army on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 23 October 1944.

 

On 30 August 1944, during the attack on Feature 111 in the Gothic Line, the leading Company of the Perth Regiment was held up by heavy machine gun fire. After going forward to contact them, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid organized an attack and by first light. The battalion, supported by a squadron of tanks, had captured its objective, and had exploited to Feature 147, well inside the Gothic Line.

 

The battalion was then ordered to capture Feature 204. At this time the whole area was subjected to very heavy artillery and mortar fire. Disregarding the fire, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid contacted a squadron of the 2 Canadian Armoured Regiment (Lord Strathcona's Horse Royal Canadians) and planned the attack. By night fall, under intense shelling, the battalion had gained it's objective, and although wounded Lieutenant-Colonel Reid moved about organizing the defence of the area.

 

At 0150 hours 31 August 1944, the position was attacked by a company of infantry, supported by two Self-Propelled guns. Lieutenant-Colonel Reid organized a counter-attack and personally formed two PIAT teams to engage the Self-Propelled guns. One of the PIATS was knocked out and number One on the other became a casualty. Lieutenant-Colonel Reid took over the remaining PIAT and crawled forward himself, knocked out the two Self-Propelled guns. The enemy attack was driven off with heavy losses, but some of the enemy had infiltrated the position and Lieutenant-Colonel Reid was again wounded by a German hand grenade. Although in great pain he refused to be evacuated until the position had been consolidated and the Second-in-Command was on his way forward to relieve him.

 

The courageous leadership, energy and determination displayed by Lieutenant-Colonel Reid enabled his battalion to be the first to gain a successful foothold in the Gothic Line.

 

RIDGE, William John, Captain - Mention In Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and CARO/5255 dated 10 January 1945.

 

ROWE, Kenneth Medcalf, Lance-Sergeant (A.11385) - Distinguished Conduct Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5283, both dated 20 January 1945. Immediate award; recommendation supported by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 16 September 1944 and passed forward on 20 September 1944; endorsed by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Division on 22 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 September 1944; endorsed by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 23 October 1944; supported by Headquarters, Eighth Army on 27 October 1944 and passed forward on 5 November 1944.

 

On 31 August 1944, during the assault on the Gothic Line, the Perth Regiment captured Feature 204. At about 0145 hours, 1 September 1944, the enemy launched a strong counter-attack on the Regimental position. The main force of the attack came through a platoon commanded by Lance-Sergeant Rowe. In the early stages of the attack some of the section positions were overrun and the platoon suffered heavy casualties, Lance-Sergeant Rowe himself being wounded in the head. Refusing medical attention at this critical juncture, he rallied what remained of his platoon and personally led three successive charges in a gallant effort to regain these lost positions. The first two attempts were beaten back after being bitterly contested but Lance-Sergeant Rowe led a third and successful assault during which he personally rushed a machine gun post with great daring and cleared the position at the point of the bayonet. In the course of this bitter fighting, 20 paratroopers were killed and 10 captured.

 

As on many other occasions, the cool determination and courageous leadership displayed by Lance-Sergeant Rowe were a real inspiration to his men and it was due to his personal gallant efforts in this critical situation that the counter-attack on his company failed and the battalion position was held.

 

SAUNDERS, Roy Derrick, Private (B.144963) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5283, both dated 20 January 1945. Immediate award; originally a Distinguished Conduct Medal; recommendation and downgraded to an immediate Military Medal. Endorsed by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 16 September 1944 and passed forward on 20 September 1944; supported by Headquarters, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 23 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 October 1944; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 23 October 1944; approved by Army on 27 October 1944 and passed for action on 5 November 1944.

 

On 31 August 1944, the Perth Regiment had succeeded in consolidating on Feature III, one of the key positions of the Gothic Line. At 1000 hours, orders were given that "B" Company would lead an attack against Feature 104, a strongly defended position situated north of Feature III. In the withering fire which was brought down on the leading Platoon, the Section Commander was killed and the Second-in-Command wounded. In spite of the heavy shelling, Private Saunders went forward in an attempt to render first aid to his Section Commander. He then assumed command of the section and led it throughout the attack.

 

Late that night, after particularly heavy fighting, "B" Company reached its objective. During this attack, Private Saunders displayed exceptional courage and leadership in controlling his section. On arrival at the objective, Private Saunders organized the defence of his sector and ensured that his section was ready for any counter-attack.

 

At 0030 hours, 1 September 1944, a determined counter-attack was made on the position. In the confused and bitter fighting that followed, Private Saunders and his section put up so fierce a resistance that the enemy was forced to withdraw.

 

The gallant actions of this soldier were an inspiration to all, and under his leadership the section contributed to the success of the attack.

 

SCHMADL, Carl, Private (A.49848) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5446, both dated 10 March 1945. Supported by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 28 December 1944 and passed forward on 5 January 1945; approved by 4 Canadian Armoured Division on 6 January 1945 and passed forward on 9 January 1945; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 10 January 1945 and passed forward on 11 January 1945; approved by Army on 13 January 1945 and passed for action on 14 January 1945.

 

On the night 19/20 December 1944, "A" Company of the Perth Regiment crossed the Fosso Munio with the task of seizing and holding the important road junction fifteen hundred yards from the bend in the canal northeast of Borgo di Villanova.

 

When 250 yards away from the objective, the leading section came under heavy machine gun and automatic rifle fire. The machine gun post had held its fire until the section was only 50 yards away and the withering fire forced the section to take cover. Private Schmadl, having located the post, immediately ran forward single-handed and when 20 yards from the post, threw a grenade, and fired a long burst from his Tommy gun, killing three of the crew and severely wounding the other two.

 

As soon as the section continued the advance, two more enemy machine gun posts, positioned about 50 yards apart, opened up from a distance of approximately 100 yards. Shouting to his comrades to follow, Private Schmadl immediately rushed the right hand post firing his Tommy gun as he ran forward. Inspired by this gallant action, the remainder of the section quickly joined him and cleared these two posts. Five of the enemy were killed, four wounded and five taken prisoner.

 

The prompt and courageous action of Private Schmadl enabled the company to infiltrate through a heavily defended line of machine gun posts and capture the objective.

 

SMITH, David Crawford, Honorary Captain - Military Cross - Canadian Chaplain Services - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 30 December 1944 and CARO/5235 dated 3 January 1945.

 

On 17 January 1944, the Perth Regiment, while putting in an attack along the Arielli River, suffered heavy casualties. Honorary Captain Smith went forward with the attacking troops before dawn and did not rest until the last casualty was evacuated long after dark. With utter disregard for his personal safety and with ever a word of cheer to encourage all ranks, he dressed wounds under shell and mortar fire throughout the day, and not one of the 70 casualties evacuated passed without a cheery greeting from "the Padre". On the following day he returned to the scene after the battalion had been withdrawn and, despite the fact that he was under enemy observation, attempted to recover or bury the casualties left on the battlefield. On 5 February 1944, while the Perth Regiment was in the Orsogna sector, extremely heavy casualties were suffered in a forward company area, 14 men being killed and 23 wounded. Honorary Captain Smith went forward immediately and worked for hours without faltering, sorting the wounded from the dead and quietly assisting in the evacuation of the former over most difficult terrain. Owing to the rough nature of the ground it was impossible to evacuate the dead for burial, but this officer, with a small voluntary part to assist him, conducted burial services in a position constantly under heavy mortar and shell fire. Throughout his two-year tour of duty with the unit, Honorary Captain Smith has been an inspiration to all with whom he has come in contact. His spirit of self-sacrifice, his cheerfulness and resourcefulness under fire, have been a shining example to all ranks and have represented in its most ideal form a devotion to duty that is without precedent.

 

SMITHSON, Gordon Murray, Corporal (B.56682) - Mention in Despatches - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

 

SPENCER, John Robert, Sergeant (A.11100) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945. Immediate award; endorsed by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 5 May 1945 and passed forward on 8 May 1945; supported by Headquarters, 4 Canadian Armoured Division on 11 May 1945 and passed forward on 21 May 1945; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 14 June 1945; approved by Army on 6 July 1945 and passed for action on 8 July 1945.

 

On the night of 28 April 1945, Sergeant Spencer was a member of "B" Company of the Perth Regiment, which was holding a position on the western side of the canal in the town of Holweirde. A portion of the town on the eastern side of the canal was held by the enemy.

 

At about 2230 hours, Sergeant Spencer observed an enemy patrol on the western bank of the canal south of the town. Appreciating the need of early information of enemy dispositions, on his own initiative Sergeant Spencer single-handed stalked the patrol and by a skillfully laid plan succeeded in capturing the three members of the patrol.

 

As a result of the information gained from the enemy patrol, Sergeant Spencer proceeded to cross the river under cover of darkness to the enemy held part of the town. With great skill and daring, he moved about the enemy positions for one and a half hours and returned to his company with detailed information of the enemy's dispositions and strength.

 

This vital information enabled the Company Commander to plan and carry out an attack on the morning of 29 April. The attack was successful despite strong opposition and the enemy were driven from Holweirde.

 

Throughout the attack Sergeant Spencer was in the vanguard at all times, clearing enemy from one basement strong point after another, during the course of which he personally captured thirty-five prisoners.

 

The dash, initiative and determination displayed by Sergeant Spencer was largely responsible for the success of the company attack.

 

THOMPSON, Douglas Herbert, Private (A.48559) - Military Medal - Infantry (Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 2 September 1944 and CARO/4986 dated 14 October 1944. "In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy." Recommended for immediate award by Lieutenant-Colonel J.S.H. Lind, Commanding Officer, Perth Regiment; approved by Brigadier T.E. Snow, Commander, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 3 June 1944 and passed forward 5 June 1944; approved by Major-General B.M. Hoffmeister, General Officer Commanding, 5 Canadian Armoured Division on 6 June 1944 and passed forward on 9 June 1944; approved by Lieutenant-General E.L.M. Burns, Commander, 1 Canadian Corps; approved by Lieutenant-General O.W.H. Leese, General Officer Commanding, Eighth Army on 14 June 1944 and passed forward on 17 June 1944; approved by General H.R. Alexander, Commander-in-Chief, Allied Central Mediterranean Force on 19 June 1944.

 

On the 27th May 1944, the battalion [Perth Regiment] had taken a position in front of Ceprano and were proceeding to consolidate. During the process of consolidation this soldier's company was subjected to very heavy shell and mortar fire from both flanks, which caused many casualties. Private Thompson, without any thought whatsoever for his personal safety, and beyond the call of duty, went forward on his own initiative and under intense enemy fire from the reserve platoon to the position occupied by a forward platoon which had suffered the most severe casualties, a distance of about 300 yards. On arrival he rendered first aid and assisted the casualties practically single-handed, as three of the four stretcher bearers of the company were amongst those wounded. He continued this task while still under very heavy shell and mortar fire for upwards of half an hour, until all casualties had been attended to, and where possible, evacuated.

 

Noticing that one man was shot through the throat, Private Thompson applied such first aid as he could. He then ran back some distance, guided up the Medical Officer, and the casualty was evacuated.

 

Throughout the entire action, Private Thompson's devotion to duty and utter lack of concern for his personal safety not only saved the lives of many of his comrades, but was an inspiration and example to all who saw his actions.

 

VERTULIA, Anthony Joseph, Private (A.11956) - Military Medal - Infantry (The Perth Regiment) - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5283, both dated 20 January 1945. Immediate award; endorsed by Headquarters, 11 Canadian Infantry Brigade on 16 September 1944 and passed forward on 20 September 1944; supported by Headquarters, 5 Canadian Armoured Brigade on 22 September 1944 and passed forward on 16 October 1944; supported by Headquarters, 1 Canadian Corps on 17 October 1944 and passed forward on 23 October 1944; approved by Army on 27 October 1944 and passed forward on 5 November 1944.

 

On 13 September 1944 at about 0230 hours, the two leading companies of The Perth Regiment reached their objective on the Coriano Feature. While consolidating, they were menaced by seven enemy tanks moving in the area, using their automatic weapons on the troops and attempting to overrun the platoon position. The only available defence against them was the platoon PIAT, manned by Private Vertulia.

 

In a singularly gallant manner, Private Vertulia moved forward to an exposed position under heavy machine gun fire, in order to engage these tanks. By accurate fire from his PIAT, he succeeded in forcing the tanks to withdraw, two Mark IV tanks having been damaged. Although this act drew the fire of the enemy tanks and infantry, Private Vertulia remained in a position to cover the most likely tank approaches, until all threat of a counter-attack had passed. This heroic deed enabled "C" Company to dig in and establish themselves, and thus contributed greatly to the success of battalion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Dwayne Hordij